How the YMCA and the Village People can help your Breastfeeding Relationship

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I don’t know anyone who has breastfed; how will I get the support I need?

You will have to build your own support network, but don’t worry there is help out there!  There are many online communities like kellymom.com as well as local support groups like La Leche League that can help you connect with other nursing mothers.  I like to use the acronym YMCA to help other moms find some village people to help establish the support they need:

Y-Your family (your husband and mom can be very influential cheerleaders)

M-Medical professionals (find a lactation consultant and a good pediatrician)

C-Community groups for breastfeeding (La Leche League, Breastfeeding USA)

A-Any breastfeeding moms you know (new mom’s groups, church, high school friends, etc)

My breastfeeding story

To illustrate, I’d like to share my breastfeeding journey, and how the Village People and my YMCA saved my breastfeeding relationship. You might have a baby who is an expert nursling, but you might also need all the help you can get!

3rd Trimester

The Road Block: Lack of Knowledge

The Village People: Birth Class

The Support:  My husband and I signed up for a birth class that offered a FULL CLASS of breastfeeding education, and an introduction to the concept of a doula, who was essential to our birth and breastfeeding support.

The birth

The Road Block: A broken tailbone and a baby who wouldn’t latch

The Village People: A doula and my husband

The Support: Our doula went above and beyond, stayed for FOUR HOURS after our birth and called her mentor for instructions on how to teach my husband to hand express colostrum while I was out of commission.

The first few days

The Road Block: A refusal to latch, jaundice, weight loss, painful engorgement

The Village People: my mom, 2 IBCLC’s, a lactation counselor, and our pediatrician

The Support:  The hospital lactation consultants worked tirelessly to help us out, and my mother supported me through tearful phone calls at all hours of the day. At our first Ped appointment, our pediatrician could have just handed us a can of formula, but instead she rushed us into see a lactation counselor, who taught me how to use a breast pump to relieve engorgement and how to feed my son a bottle until we could get a latch.

Six weeks

The Road Block: Pain, and lots of it

The Village People: My husband, our childbirth educator, an IBCLC, and a cranial-sacral therapist

The Support:  Thanks to the pump and bottle, our son was gaining weight, but the latch was still wrong.  I thought about giving up, but my husband encouraged me to speak to our childbirth educator, who referred me to an IBCLC.  She diagnosed an upper lip tie and taught me how to adjust my son’s latch.  It helped a little, and combined with a referral to a cranial-sacral therapist, our son was finally latching pain-free within a month.

2 months

The Road Block: Colic and later, projectile vomit after every feeding

The Village People: A lactation consultant, a pediatrician and a mommy friend

The Support: The lactation consultant was able to diagnose an oversupply issue and the pediatrician suggested my son might have a dairy allergy.  A mommy friend helped me adjust to the new diet, and within days the hours of endless screaming had stopped.

4 months

The Road Block: Teething and biting

The Village People: Nurse and Chat

The support: Within a few minutes at Nurse and Chat, a lactation consultant gave me several tips to help me nurse a teething baby who was using me as a teething ring. It was that easy, but imagine if I had never gone in!

8 Months:

The road block: A lack of sleep from a babe who wanted to nurse all night

The Village People: La Leche League, New Mom’s Group, and our pediatrician

The support: Old friends from my New Mom’s Group suggested I read the No Cry Sleep Solution, and my local La Leche League had it to borrow from their lending library.  Our pediatrician gave us words of encouragement at our son’s nine-month appointment, and it really helped to lift our spirits.

And beyond:

I know that as my son approaches toddlerhood, our nursing relationship will change again.  Because I have my own personal YMCA, I will know whom to call to get my answers so that I can have true success feeding my child.  For all you expectant and nursing mothers out there, I hope that you can also build a network to support you through your breastfeeding years